Insertables

NFC & RFID Microchip FAQ’S

NFC & RFID Microchip FAQ’S

There are predictable questions I get asked over and over again when someone finds out what I research, and that I have 2 microchips inside my body. These same questions pop up on social media every time I appear on TV or in the news.

Some people refused to believe the reality of how these chips work, and there’s no point trying to change these minds; the “the Government is secretley tracking you with a microchip you recieved at birth, it’s all about the New World Order and they’ll switch you off if you don’t comply” crowd.

This post is not for them. This post answers the FAQs for people genuinely interested in learning about the technology and educating themselves on the reality.

The UX of Using a Microchip for Access

The UX of Using a Microchip for Access

According to Tile, Australian’s spend an average of 29 minutes per day searching for something they have lost. To get around the fallibility of human memory, people have taken to ‘life hacks’ so that they can’t forget their pass. Some individuals have gotten small microchips, the size of a grain of rice, underneath their skin for the guarantee that as long as they have their hand (which for the record, none of them have forgotten) they cannot forget their keys.



Sounds like Science Fiction

Sounds like Science Fiction

I appear in this article by Kate Stanton. This article was first published on Pursuit. This post only shows my section. Read the full article to read about Bionic Vision, Intelligent Transport, Robots and Cyborgs and the Bionic Spine.

Towards insertables: Devices inside the human body

Towards insertables: Devices inside the human body

As technology becomes smaller, the way we carry it has progressed from luggable, to wearable and now towards devices that reside inside the human body, or insertables. We demonstrate this trajectory towards devices inside the human body, and carve out insertables as a specific subset of devices which are voluntary, non-surgical and removable.

You put what, where? Hobbyist use of insertable devices (Part 2)

The human body has emerged as more than just a canvas for wearable electronic devices. Technological size and cost reductions, along with power and battery improvements, has meant items that were once external have become wearable, and even insertable. 

In part 2 we look at our results - what are participants inserting and what does this mean for the future of HCI & UX?

You put what, where? Hobbyist use of insertable devices (Part 1)

The human body has emerged as more than just a canvas for wearable electronic devices. Technological size and cost reductions, along with power and battery improvements, has meant items that were once external have become wearable, and even insertable.

 

Part 1 gives background to my research to be presented at the CHI conference in San Jose this week.

Insertables: I’ve got I.T. under my skin

An intro to Insertabeles, as published in ACM interactions. 

Imagine Dylan, a bureaucrat working in a foreign embassy. Dylan approaches a security door, arms overflowing with confidential reports. Dylan leans toward the door’s access sensor and is authenticated. The door is now unlocked and can be easily pushed open with one shoulder, without the need to put down the documents and fumble for his keys or an access pass. Dylan has an insertable device implanted subcutaneously in his hand that interacts with the transponder at the office door.

It may read as science fiction, but it's already a reality.