You put what, where? Hobbyist use of insertable devices (Part 2)

The human body has emerged as more than just a canvas for wearable electronic devices. Technological size and cost reductions, along with power and battery improvements, has meant items that were once external have become wearable, and even insertable. 

In part 2 we look at our results - what are participants inserting and what does this mean for the future of HCI & UX?

You put what, where? Hobbyist use of insertable devices (Part 1)

The human body has emerged as more than just a canvas for wearable electronic devices. Technological size and cost reductions, along with power and battery improvements, has meant items that were once external have become wearable, and even insertable.

 

Part 1 gives background to my research to be presented at the CHI conference in San Jose this week.

Guys as the new ‘um’

Gendered words can be, and are, damaging to some recipients (and effectively the deliverer). You’re probably not even aware of the fact that you’re alineting or demeaning your audience. I, and a lot of other women, have a visceral reaction to the term and it’s important you are aware of the impacts of choosing to using it. Let's talk about "guys". 

Insertables: I’ve got I.T. under my skin

An intro to Insertabeles, as published in ACM interactions. 

Imagine Dylan, a bureaucrat working in a foreign embassy. Dylan approaches a security door, arms overflowing with confidential reports. Dylan leans toward the door’s access sensor and is authenticated. The door is now unlocked and can be easily pushed open with one shoulder, without the need to put down the documents and fumble for his keys or an access pass. Dylan has an insertable device implanted subcutaneously in his hand that interacts with the transponder at the office door.

It may read as science fiction, but it's already a reality. 

Designing for People you Didn't Know Existed

Designing for People you Didn't Know Existed

Last week a few of us from SEEK went to UX Australia, a conference dedicated to all things user experience. I gave a 10-minute talk at UX Australia which was recorded and will eventually be available but in the mean time here’s a sneak peak.

By now we all know we are not the user, it has been drilled in to us enough times. But how do you design for people you might not know exist. How many genders are there? You might think two if you’ve never met an intersex person.